Friday, February 16, 2018

Why is This Weapon Magical?

Roll 2d6:

2 - A wizard did it. On purpose, that it.

3 - The weapon comes from another realm/world/dimension/plane/reality, where things just work differently. A weapon (or other object) from here would probably behave "strangely" relative to the surrounding laws of science/magic over there, too.

4 - The weapon's magical properties are the unintentional result of some other phenomenon. It could be the byproduct of a spell or experiment, or it could have just been in the right place at the right time when some magical phenomenon ("natural" or otherwise) occurred. Maybe someone just left this weapon on a ley line and forgot about it for a hundred years.

5 - The weapon was forged from a rare material with magical properties. It could be mithril or Valyrian steel or adamantium or metal forged from a fallen star or whatever.

6 - The weapon has been used to kill so many supernatural beings (or such a powerful supernatural being) that some magic has rubbed off on it.*

7 - The weapon is only magical in a certain context. Silver weapons hurt werewolves. Oak stakes hurt vampires. A ghost might be banished by the same weapon that killed their corporeal form, due to their lingering fear of it. In short, the weapon has magical effects in certain circumstances due to the properties of the being under attack, or the "natural" relationship between the weapon and a supernatural force.

8 - See Result 6.*

9 - The weapon was forged with a rare technique which imbued it with supernatural properties. The creator of the weapon was not a wizard in the stereotypical sense; they were just such a master craftsman or such a knowledgeable expert that they knew how to make the weapon supernaturally extraordinary. This could involve a ritual, a blessing, another magic item, advanced technology, magic runes, a crafting technique that is just so darn good it causes "magical" effects to arise from "mundane" processes, or what have you.

10 - The weapon is possessed by a ghost, a demon, or some other spirit or ethereal creature. (Or perhaps an artificial intelligence if you want a little SF in your fantasy.)

11 - The weapon was imbued with supernatural significance due to a weird or particularly awful tragedy. Maybe it's the axe of an executioner who was tricked into beheading his own family. Maybe it's the first weapon to ever shed the blood of a child. Maybe it's the sword that was used to murder a benevolent empress and end the longest period of peace in history. Maybe it's the single arrow used over and over by a serial killer to shoot every one of his victims. Think of ghost stories or fairy tales or ancient mythology.**

12 - A god did it. Maybe they crafted or enchanted it on purpose. Maybe the weapon is just a figment of a god's imagination. Maybe the weapon is a piece of a god.***

*If a dungeon or other adventure location is overflowing with +1 weapons, I think this might serve as a better explanation for their presence than the idea that a magic-user cranked out a bunch of magic weapons that their class can't use, but your mileage may vary. I personally like this concept a lot, which is why it appears twice on the table, and why the table is so heavily weighted toward this result. You could kind of see this as a more specific form of Result 4, so if you want to adapt this table to other magic items besides weapons, it probably wouldn't hurt to switch Result 4 to Results 6 and 8, and come up with a new idea for the now-vacant Result 4.

**I got this idea from a plot device in the recent film Winchester. It wasn't a very good movie, unfortunately, but it did have some ideas that I think could be salvaged for better use in a different context. The movie's "magic weapon" of note came across as pretty darn silly (and unintentionally so, I believe), but I think it could have worked with a better set up, or in a different story.

***I guess this could overlap with just about any other result on the table. There's a lot of potential overlap between ideas on this table, really, but I think that's okay. My main purpose here was to brainstorm different origins for magic weapons, especially "common" ones, other than what I perceive as the standard "made by a wizard" explanation in fantasy RPG adventures.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Weird Fantasy Musical To-Do List

So I've really been into the band Comus lately. Specifically, I picked up Song to Comus: The Complete Collection, which I believe includes almost all of their work, after listening to some of their music on Youtube. And oh boy, did First Utterance knock my socks off, presumably leaving them in a muddy crevice somewhere in the woods for a creepy little girl to find while she's off communing with unwholesome cosmic spirits. As previously mentioned, I've also been greatly enjoying Swans for a little while now, and I've been trying to use spooky and weird music here and there as both background music while gaming and a general source of game-related inspiration.

I've also been collecting music recommendations from strange places like the Lamentations of the Flame Princess community, the TV Tropes Nightmare Fuel page, and this video from Youtube reviewer Grim Beard.

The point is, I want to listen to some new stuff. Especially some odd stuff, and some scary stuff, and some gloomy stuff. Stuff that fits in well with horror or weird/dark fantasy gaming, or even just fantasy or science fiction gaming in general. So here's my musical to-do list. If, for some reason, you need a d50 table of bands your priest probably wouldn't approve of, here you go. If you have any suggestions, hey, why don't we make it a d100 table?
  1. Agalloch - The Mantle
  2. Alcest - Souvenirs d'un Autre Monde
  3. Amebix - No Sanctuary: The Spiderleg Recordings
  4. An Autumn for Crippled Children - Try Not to Destroy Everything You Love
  5. Black Sabbath (I mean, I enjoy their greatest hits CD, but I should probably check out their actual full albums, you know?)
  6. Briton Rites - For Mircalla
  7. Candlemass - Epicus Doomicus Mettallicus
  8. Celtic Frost - Monotheist
  9. Coldworld - Autumn
  10. Cradle of Filth
  11. Curved Air
  12. The Darkest of the Hillside Thickets
  13. Dream Theater
  14. Emerson, Lake & Palmer
  15. Frank Zappa
  16. Gallowbraid - Ashen Eidolen
  17. Genesis - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway
  18. Gentle Giant
  19. Godspeed You! Black Emperor (I really enjoy Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven, and I'm thinking I'll probably try Luciferian Towers next.)
  20. The Great Old Ones - Tekeli-Li
  21. GWAR
  22. Hawkwind
  23. Iggy Pop
  24. Jess and the Ancient Ones
  25. Jethro Tull
  26. King Crimson - In the Court of the Crimson King
  27. Locrian - Return to Annihilation
  28. Nadja - Radiance of Shadows
  29. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - Let Love In
  30. Om - Pilgrimage
  31. Opeth
  32. Pink Floyd (I like The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall, so I figure I should see what else they've done.)
  33. Reverend Bizarre
  34. Sahg - Sahg I
  35. Samael - Ceremony of Opposites
  36. Slayer - Reign in Blood
  37. Sleep
  38. Sunn O)))
  39. The Sword - Age of Winters
  40. Throbbing Gristle
  41. Tool
  42. Tom Waits (I have Bone Machine, but I need to get more of his work, or at least a copy of Real Gone.)
  43. Upwards of Endtime - Sadly Never Fore
  44. Van der Graff Generator
  45. Vattnet - Settler
  46. Vintersorg - Orkan
  47. Witchfinder General
  48. Wolves in the Throne Room
  49. Wreck & Reference - Want
  50. Yes
If an album title is listed, that's probably where I'll start with that band, before moving on to their other work if I end up liking them. If no album is listed, then I'm probably not sure exactly where to begin yet.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

D10 Fighter Advancement Table for LotFP

This is just a quick and dirty idea I had for making level advancement for fighters in Lamentations of the Flame Princess a bit more interesting. It's basically an extremely simplified, stripped-down version of this random advancement system by "Zak S., Reynaldo Madriñan, Jeff Rients, Chris Wilson, Nick Kuntz, Matt Halbauer, and lots of other cool people," but specifically for LotFP fighters only.

Beyond level 9, most classes continue to get better at their main class feature in some way: magic-users continue to get spells per day, specialists continue to get skill points, etc. However, fighters don't really get anything special beyond that point other than additional HP and better saves (which other classes still get as well, to some extent). This is just a rough idea for giving fighters something class-specific to look forward to if they survive past level 9, with the added benefit of potentially differentiating individual fighters a little more, if you feel the need for that.

Every level, the fighter chooses to either take their normal +1 base attack bonus, or roll 1d10 on the table below. If the fighter's base attack bonus is maxed out at +10, they must roll on the table.
  1. Nice try, but you still get a +1 base attack bonus anyway. But, if your base attack bonus is already maxed out at +10, you get to choose any result from this table instead.
  2. Do you even lift? It takes five additional items to gain the first point of encumbrance (as per the dwarf class in LotFP). If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.
  3. Your hit die increases from d8 to d10, and if you have a positive constitution modifier, you continue to add it to your HP after level 9 (as per the dwarf class in LotFP). Go ahead and reroll all of your hit dice. If the result is greater than your previous maximum HP, keep the new result. If it is equal to or less than your previous maximum HP, your new maximum HP simply becomes your old maximum HP plus 1. If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.
  4. Nothing gets past you. You are only surprised on a 1 in 6 (as per the elf class in LotFP). If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.
  5. You've got the touch! If an enemy can normally only be hit by a magic weapon, or by some other special kind of weapon (silver, for example), you can instead hit them with any kind of weapon. If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.
  6. FIGHTER SMASH! You gain the ability to enter a state of RAGE, as per Vacant Ritual Assembly #4, page 18. If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.*
  7. Increase the amount of damage you do with any weapon (including your bare hands) by 1 die size, following this pattern: 1-->d2-->d3-->d4-->d6-->d8-->d10-->d12-->d20 (the maximum for mundane weapons). If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.
  8. Show us your moves! You get a second attack per round. If you have already gotten this result once before, you now get a third attack per round. If you have already gotten this result twice before, you can either make three attacks per round or you can make one attack against every enemy within melee range that has 1 HD or less. If you have already gotten this result at least three times before, see Result 1 instead.
  9. Roll a d4: 1 equals Charisma, 2 equals Constitution, 3 equals Dexterity, and 4 equals Strength. Increase the corresponding ability's modifier by +1. (For example, if you have a Charisma of 16 and you roll a 1, your Charisma modifier increases from +2 to +3.) Each ability modifier can only be increased this way once, so if you roll the same ability again, re-roll until you get a new one. If you have already increased all four of these ability modifiers before, see Result 1 instead.
  10. You paid attention to something beyond your big beatin' stick. You gain 2 skill points.
*If you don't have a copy of Vacant Ritual Assembly #4, or if you just don't care for this result and want to replace it with something else, here's an alternative result inspired by this post from Gregorius21778:
6. This is your skin now. Treat chain armor as a regularly-encumbering item, so that it only takes up one encumbrance slot (instead of adding a whole encumbrance point by itself like an oversized item). Treat plate armor as a regular oversized item, so that it only adds one point of encumbrance instead of two. If you are using the Early Modern armor rules, then treat buff coats, all helmets, and tassets as unencumbering, treat pikeman's armor as a regularly-encumbering item, and treat full armor as a regular oversized item. If you have already gotten this result once before, see Result 1 instead.

Sunday, December 24, 2017

Candy Swordcane

A type of weapon crafted by the Boreal Elves as part of their war effort against the Mouse Emperor of Babylon, this walking stick smells strongly of peppermint and bears a striped pattern reminiscent of the heraldic flag of the legendary 7th Automated Regiment, the "Nutcrackers." In its "cane" state, it functions as a standard quarterstaff.

If someone spends an hour licking the end of the cane, it will gradually sharpen into a thin, sharp, sticky blade. Each additional person who helps lick the cane subtracts ten minutes from the time required to sharpen it, down to a minimum of ten minutes to complete the process. Anyone who participates in this licking process will be unable to smell or taste anything but the peppermint and sugar coating their mouth for the next hour.

Once sharpened, the Candy Swordcane becomes a magic weapon, granting +2 to hit and damage against most targets, and +4 to hit and damage against vermin, children, and creatures with huge open mouths.

When the first successful, damage-dealing hit is made using the sharpened Candy Swordcane, there is a 1-in-12 chance that it shatters, losing its magical properties and becoming nearly useless as a weapon - at best, one could use a fragment of the broken weapon as a brittle makeshift dagger. If the Candy Swordcane does not shatter on the first successful hit, the next such hit results in a 2-in-12 chance of it breaking, then a 3-in-12 chance on the third such hit, and so on, giving the weapon a maximum of 12 damage-dealing attacks before breaking.

Rumour has it that the Boreal Elves have begun designing Candy Lance-Canes for the Turtledove Cavalry of the 2nd Gingerbread Regiment.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Specialist for My "Separate Race and Class" System in LotFP

This is the first draft of a Specialist class for my system of house rules for separating race and class in Lamentations of the Flame Princess. If a player wants to make an Elven Assassin or a Dwarven Ranger or (heresy of heresies!) a Halfling Bard or something weird like that which doesn't quite fit into a class that is already available, this should hopefully be enough to cover most such cases, along with the addition of new skills to the game if necessary.

I originally approached this as a sort of variant on the Fighter class in this system - I figured that if the Fighter is "balanced," then maybe I could balance a new class (well, "new" for this purpose) by starting with the Fighter and tweaking things from there. I don't know if it shows at all, beyond the experience table. I was caught between the Fighter and Specialist Saving Throw tables - I picked the Specialist table for now, in order to make the Fighter a bit tougher than the Specialist, but I'm still not entirely decided. If anyone would like to share their thoughts on improving this version of the Specialist, or some other aspect of these house rules, I would appreciate the feedback.

The Specialist

Hit Dice and Minimum First-Level HP: As chosen race
Saving Throw Table if Human: As original Specialist class
Saving Throw Table if Not Human: As corresponding original LotFP race-as-class

Experience Table if Human: As original Specialist class
Experience Table if Not Human: As corresponding original LotFP race-as-class

Alignment: Any

Class Abilities

Skill Points: In addition to any Skill Points gained due to the character's chosen race, the Specialist gains 4 Skill Points at first level and 1 Skill Point per level after that.

Combat Options: At the cost of 2 Skill Points, the Specialist can gain the extra Combat Options of the Fighter class (i.e. Press, Defensive Fighting, and the superior version of Parry). If the Specialist wishes to gain these extra Combat Options after first level, a Skill Point can be "saved up" - the Specialist can choose to gain one less Skill Point at one level in order to gain one extra Skill Point at the next level.

Non-Human Skills: Humans can spend the Skill Points provided by this class on any skills, just like the Skill Points gained due to their race. Other races, due to the way they advance in specific skills at specific levels, may have restrictions on how they allocate Skill Points. The Referee should choose one of the following 3 rules to apply to the Specialist class (ideally at the beginning of the campaign or adventure) and inform all players of that choice.
  1. Non-human Specialists cannot spend Skill Points on any "racial skills" - the Search skill for the Elf race, Architecture for the Dwarf race, Bushcraft and Stealth for the Halfling race, and any skills that increase in a similar manner for any other Player Character race added to the game.
  2. Non-human Specialists can spend Skill Points on "racial skills" (as defined above), but any ranks gained in a "racial skill" beyond 6 are lost. (For example, if an Elf Specialist puts 2 extra Skill Points into Search at first level, for a total of 4 ranks in Search, and does not put any additional Skill Points into Search after that, then the Elf will have 5 ranks in Search at fourth level, and 6 ranks in Search from seventh level on. The Skill Points that the Elf would ordinarily gain at tenth level and thirteenth level for the Search skill are lost.)
  3. Non-human Specialists can spend Skill Points on "racial skills" (as defined above), and any additional ranks  gained in a "racial skill" beyond 6 become extra Skill Points that can be spent on any other skill of the Specialist's choice. (For example, if an Elf Specialist puts 2 extra Skill Points into Search at first level, for a total of 4 ranks in Search, and does not put any additional Skill Points into Search after that, then the Elf will have 5 ranks in Search at fourth level, and 6 ranks in Search from seventh level on. The Skill Points that the Elf would ordinarily gain at tenth level and thirteenth level for the Search skill can be spent on other skills instead.)
EDIT ON DEC. 4, 2017
Here's a quick design note I just posted over on Facebook:

I should note that I was HEAVILY considering making this a demihuman-only class, since humans already get skill points just like the original Specialist in this system of house rules. Using my little system here, a human assassin or ranger or whatever could easily just be a human fighter with points in the appropriate skills. Demihumans couldn't do that, so I figured I would throw them a bone: if they want to specialize, they can, but at the cost of losing out on being a decent Fighter or being able to use magic. BUT...then I thought back to how a friend of mine convinced me that restricting classes by race kind of sucks a little bit, and I thought that, hey, maybe a player might want to run a non-magical, non-violent human specialist of some kind, like a doctor or a scholar or something, and who am I to tell them they can't send their poor first-level librarian down into a filthy hole in the ground to die? So I decided to allow human Specialists, too. At least for now.

EDIT ON DEC. 19, 2017
I made two major alterations to this class.

First, I changed the "Experience Table if Human" from the "original Fighter class" to the "original Specialist class." The Human Fighter has the advantages of increasing base attack bonus, free "Combat Options," better saving throws, and faster firearm reloading (Rules & Magic p. 159 and 161). The Human Specialist is trading all of that away for some extra skill points. I figured I could at least throw this type of character a bone by cutting down the experience requirements a little.

Second, under "Class Abilities," the "Skill Points" section originally read "In addition to any Skill Points gained due to the character's chosen race, the Specialist gains 4 Skill Points at first level and 1 Skill Point per level at second to ninth level. (This class does not provide extra Skill Points beyond ninth level.)" I thought that was a bit too harsh, so now the Specialist just gets 1 Skill Point per level after the first, without limit.

Update to Optional Race and Alignment Restrictions
As I said before, I probably wouldn't use these kinds of restrictions, but just in case:
  • Humans can choose any alignment. They can be Fighters, Specialists*, Clerics (if Lawful), Magic-Users (if Chaotic), or Fools (if Neutral).
  • Dwarves are always Lawful. They can be Fighters, Specialists, or Clerics.
  • Elves are always Chaotic. They can be Fighters, Specialists, or Magic-Users.
  • Halflings are always Neutral. They can be Fighters, Specialists, or Fools.
*If the DM wishes, Humans could be disallowed from being Specialists, since they already get Specialist-like skills as a racial ability. This would make Specialists the only standard class specifically restricted by race, rather than alignment.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Alice/Fool for My "Separate Race and Class" System in LotFP

One thing I didn't care for when I wrote my method of separating race and class in LotFP was the limited number of classes included. Four races seem like enough, at least to start with, but I would have liked to include at least four classes as well. (You can always add more, of course, but I wanted four of each by default.) So, here's how I would use the Alice/Fool class from A Red & Pleasant Land with my race-and-class house rules.

The Fool

Hit Dice and Minimum First-Level HP: As chosen race

Saving Throw Table if Human: As original Specialist class
Saving Throw Table if Not Human: As corresponding original LotFP race-as-class

Experience Table if Human: As original Specialist class
Experience Table if Not Human: As corresponding original LotFP race-as-class

Class Abilities

Exasperation: As per A Red & Pleasant Land p. 30-31

Level-Up Table: At first level and every time the Fool levels up, roll d30 twice on the following table and reference the corresponding result on the original d100 table from A Red & Pleasant Land p. 32-33.
  1. Result 71 on the original table: "She noticed the Red Knight always feinted to his left..."
  2. Result 72 on the original table: "Alice liked pies..."
  3. Result 73 on the original table: "She closed her eyes and said the words..."
  4. Result 74 on the original table: "Oh, I do so apologize..."
  5. Result 75 on the original table: "Her sister had mentioned they were dreadful people..."
  6. Result 76 on the original table: "All that hiding..."
  7. Result 77 on the original table: "It seemed nearly everything was dangerous..."
  8. Result 78 on the original table: "It was very shiny..."
  9. Result 79 on the original table: "She was not such a mouse..."
  10. Result 80 on the original table: "Alice then did something quite astonishing..."
  11. Result 81 on the original table: "The blue one certainly did make the Alice taller..."
  12. Result 82 on the original table: "She could be very charming..."
  13. Result 83 on the original table: "It really was curious..."
  14. Result 84 on the original table: "She knew to curtsey..."
  15. Result 85 on the original table: "It was so lovely..."
  16. Result 86 on the original table: "She had not known her mother's cousin very well..."
  17. Result 87 on the original table: "They kept talking..."
  18. Result 88 on the original table: "She knew from school what the word meant..."
  19. Result 89 on the original table: "Alice quite liked drawing..."
  20. Result 90 on the original table: "She thought it might be a saltcellar..."
  21. Result 91-93 on the original table: "She did seem to offend people..."
  22. Result 91-93 on the original table: "She did seem to offend people..."
  23. Result 91-93 on the original table: "She did seem to offend people..."
  24. Result 94 on the original table: "They all listened attentively..."
  25. Result 95 on the original table: "They began to throw stones..."
  26. Result 96 on the original table: "She began to feel somewhat neglected."
  27. Result 97-98 on the original table: "She tried to remember what she knew about stoats."
  28. Result 97-98 on the original table: "She tried to remember what she knew about stoats."
  29. Result 99-100 on the original table: "Alice had seen so many unusual things lately..."
  30. Result 99-100 on the original table: "Alice had seen so many unusual things lately..."
Alternative Level-Up Table
If no one at the table has a d30, or if the DM wishes to exclude certain results, a d20 table could be used instead. Here is one possibility*:
  1. Result 71 on the original table: "She noticed the Red Knight always feinted to his left..."
  2. Result 72 on the original table: "Alice liked pies..."
  3. Result 74 on the original table: "Oh, I do so apologize..."
  4. Result 75 on the original table: "Her sister had mentioned they were dreadful people..."
  5. Result 76 on the original table: "All that hiding..."
  6. Result 77 on the original table: "It seemed nearly everything was dangerous..."
  7. Result 78 on the original table: "It was very shiny..."
  8. Result 80 on the original table: "Alice then did something quite astonishing..."
  9. Result 81 on the original table: "The blue one certainly did make the Alice taller..."
  10. Result 82 on the original table: "She could be very charming..."
  11. Result 83 on the original table: "It really was curious..."
  12. Result 84 on the original table: "She knew to curtsey..."
  13. Result 87 on the original table: "They kept talking..."
  14. Result 89 on the original table: "Alice quite liked drawing..."
  15. Result 90 on the original table: "She thought it might be a saltcellar..."
  16. Result 91-93 on the original table: "She did seem to offend people..."
  17. Result 95 on the original table: "They began to throw stones..."
  18. Result 96 on the original table: "She began to feel somewhat neglected."
  19. Result 97-98 on the original table: "She tried to remember what she knew about stoats."
  20. Result 99-100 on the original table: "Alice had seen so many unusual things lately..."
Optional Race and Alignment Restrictions
I prefer to allow any combination of race and class, and to ditch alignment altogether. But if someone put a gun to my head and told me I had to use race- and alignment-based class restrictions, I'd probably do this:
  • Humans can choose any class and any alignment.
  • Dwarves are always Lawful, and are thus restricted to being Fighters or Clerics.
  • Elves are always Chaotic, and are thus restricted to being Fighters or Magic-Users.
  • Halflings are always Neutral, and are thus restricted to being Fighters or Fools.
  • Clerics must be Lawful, Magic-Users must be Chaotic, and Fools must be Neutral. Fighters can choose any alignment.
If anyone actually cares, I can explain my reasoning for this alignment setup later. Hint: Check out this post at METAL vs. SKIN.

From the Nintendo Power Link to the Past comic by Shotaro Ishinomori.. Image borrowed from here.


*Personally, I would probably use this table instead of the d30 one, because it removes some of the results from the original table that I don't particularly care for.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

The Tower of Worlds - A Campaign Concept Based on "The Final Fantasy Legend" AKA "Makai Toushi Sa·Ga"

This is inspired by The Final Fantasy Legend (Makai Toushi Sa·Ga in Japan), the Dark Tower series by Stephen King (and related stories), THIS POST over at Tales of the Grotesque and Dungeonesque, and the Tower of Babel (naturally). It is also a follow up to THIS POST, and could perhaps work well with THIS ONE.

Image is from HERE

This is basically a framework for a Dungeons & Dragons or Lamentations of the Flame Princess campaign, or the fantasy RPG of your choice. The idea is that there's a magic Tower which (possibly among other things) allows travel between different "worlds" or planets or universes or alternate realities or...something. No one seems to be quite sure, especially since the Tower is imperceptible and intangible to most people - the few who can see and interact with it have little in common, and may be "chosen" at random - and there are conflicting reports about exactly where the Tower is located. Pretty much everyone who even knows and cares about the Tower in the players' starting world is working from old legends and theories and such. The few who have entered the Tower and returned report that the way up is blocked, and the way down leads to some strange, hostile places.

Oh, and the legends claim that God lives at the top of the Tower, and He loves to grant wishes for anyone who can make it to the top to come see Him.

The players begin in the world of Floor 1. They quickly discover that they are among those "chosen" to be able to perceive the Tower, which they find in the middle of an unsuspecting town. If the players choose to enter the Tower, they find that the staircase to Floor 2 is sealed off by a magical barrier, but the stairs down to the first basement (Floor B1) are unobstructed. The first floor also contains a clue as to how the players can find the key to unsealing Floor 2, located somewhere in their own world on Floor 1. If the players ever make their way to Floors 5, 10, 16, and possibly 23, they will similarly find the way further upward sealed off, with keys to breaking the seals in those worlds.

The players can set their own goals if they want, naturally, such as exploring one or more worlds or getting involved in various conflicts throughout the multiverse or discovering the secret meaning or purpose(s) behind the Tower or just killing things and taking their stuff. But the most obvious possible goal would be to climb the whole Tower and meet God, and maybe get some wishes granted. If the players are feeling especially fond of JRPG tropes, or just feeling really Metal, they could even try to kill God and take His place or something.

One more thing: the magic "seals" between Floors 1 and 2, between Floors 5 and 6, etc. actually only block traffic in one direction, namely upward. Strange people (and stranger creatures) sometimes travel down the Tower and find themselves unable to return from whence they came. The starting world on Floor 1 is home to some such travelers, as are most or all of the other worlds. A really tricky DM could add seals on Floors B3, B5, and B6, so that players who explore downward cannot return upward without completing some kind of quest(s) to break one or more seals. I listed these floors as "once sealed" below, but there's no reason you couldn't have those seals still be active.

You could use all kinds of campaign settings and modules to flesh out the Tower's multiverse. If I were to use the rules and materials from LotFP, for example, here's how I would probably arrange the various worlds of the Tower:

Floor B6: This is the base of the tower, rooted in the Veins of the Earth. (Maybe the bottom of the Tower could be the Deep Carbon Observatory, hanging from the ceiling in a giant cavern in the Veins.) There could be other Towers accessible throughout the Veins. Other worlds than these. There is evidence that the Door to Floor B5 was once sealed.

Floor B5: Exits to Narcosa. Drug-using NPCs who originally hail from higher in the tower constantly make lame jokes about "The Underground Drug Trade." (Ha ha! Get it? Snort.) There is evidence that the Door to Floor B4 was once sealed.

Floor B4: Exits to The Gem Prison of Zardax. If there used to be another world here (outside of the Prison), it's gone now, replaced by the technicolor void.

Floor B3: Exits to Towers Two. There is evidence that the Door to Floor B2 was once sealed.

Floor B2: Exits to the flower plantation of The Pale Lady.
Note that there can sometimes be alternative methods of travelling between worlds other than climbing or descending the Tower, but that these "shortcuts" may be dangerous, unpredictable, or time-sensitive. For example, you could allow the players temporary access to this world as per The Pale Lady, but if they miss their window of opportunity to return the way they came, they may have to climb the Tower in order to get back home.

Floor 1: Earth, or Oerth, or Mystara, or Avalon Hill's Outdoor Survival map, or whatever you want the "normal" world to be. Door to Floor 2 is sealed.

Floor 3: Exits to a town known as Pembrooktonshire, where the residents insist everything is practically perfect just the way it is. Heavenly, even. After all, didn't you climb up to get here? And isn't this the top of the tower? (They all seem to be convinced it is, even though there's clearly an unblocked path to Floor 4.) Some "halflings" were recently run out of town - see Lamentations of the Gingerbread Princess. There are also dangerous "monsters" in the mountains - see No Dignity in Death and Hammers of the God. Could also tie in nicely with the adventure "In Heaven, Everything is Fine" from Forgive Us.
Alternatively: If you want to make Pembrooktonshire and its surroundings the starting world on Floor 1, you could have Floor 3 exit to Hot Springs Island.

Floor 4: Exits to Weird New World. The elves are not native here; they descended the Tower from another world, and now believe they are in Hell.

Floor 5: Exits to The Driftwood Verses. Door to Floor 6 is sealed.

Floor 7: Exits to the Isle of the Unknown.

Floor 10: Exits to A Red & Pleasant Land. Door to Floor 11 is sealed.

Floor 12: Exits to the city of Vornheim.

Floor 13: Exits to Bad Myrmidon. Currently undergoing a bad drought.

Floor 14: Exits to Scenic Dunnsmouth. If something is done about the Time Cube, it starts raining again in the world connected to Floor 13.

Floor 16: Exits to Carcosa. (Maybe the titular city is abandoned due to something involving the Tower? Maybe the Tower is in the city, or is the city, on this Floor?) Door to Floor 17 is sealed.

Floor 21: Exits to Qelong.

Floor 23: Exits to The Chaos Gods Come to Meatlandia. Maybe throw in some material from The Hateful Place, since things have gone so incredibly wrong in this world.

Things could go one of two ways from here. Either the door to Floor 24 is sealed, and the Tower continues upward for a while longer, in which case we have...

Floor 31: The top floor. This is supposedly where God dwells.

...or Floor 23 is actually the top floor...inside the Tower, that is. In this case, Meatlandia is actually the same world as the one where the campaign started out on Floor 1, except far in the future. Now a new path can be traveled up the outside of the Tower, leading to...

The Roof (a.k.a. Floor 24): This is supposedly where God dwells.

Either way, if the party actually makes it to the top of the Tower, it should be within the realm of possibility that they can kick the ass of whatever so-called God dwells up there and take His Most Holy Stuff. It doesn't have to be easy. Success could be so remote that calling it a long shot is like saying the trip to Alpha Centauri is a long flight. But if they make it this far, I think I, as the referee, owe it to the players to prevent the ultimate boss fight from being completely hopeless. I mean, look at the video game I swiped this Tower business from. Take it from Jackie Kashian: deicide is a great way to end a fantasy game.

If the party vanquishes God or "God" or whoever the man in the funny hat turns out to be, a big magical door is revealed. Where does it go? Beats me.

Image is from HERE

P.S. I would assume that all PCs are among the "chosen" who can find and enter the Tower. As for hirelings and other NPCs that the players may want to bring with them between worlds, you could handle this in a few ways. The DM could roll randomly to see if a given NPC is "chosen." The players could discover a way to grant "chosen" status to normal people (at some kind of cost, of course). The DM could decide that being "chosen" requires being controlled by a real-life player, i.e. being a PC, as a sort of "meta" element to the game, and any NPC who becomes a PC suddenly becomes "chosen." Or you could use a combination of these elements, or do something else.